Testing (Film) Fixer For Exhaustion

Film fixer can be re-used repeatedly — but how do you tell when it is exhausted? The classical trick is to check the clearing time, i.e. the time it takes for the film to go clear in the fixer.

Choosing Black and White Films

To this day, we believe that if you want the finest possible black and white prints, black and white film is the way to go.

How Do I (And Why Should I) Load 35mm Bulk Film?

You can save quite a lot of money by loading 35mm film from bulk, and you can load whatever lengths you want. You can also experiment with odd rolls of bulk film that you buy cheap or indeed are given.

Processing Sheet Film In A Paterson Orbital

Processing sheet film is a perennial problem, especially for the beginner. The Paterson Orbital tank, designed for processing colour prints, is extremely useful for formats up to 8×10 inches.

Kodak Ektar 100 film

Ektar 100 is an odd film. It’s incredibly rewarding if you use it properly, and quite close to a disaster if you don’t.

Shirley Wellard

Introducing the Shirley-Wellard Type C Universal Cassette. Instructions for loading and using the universal cassette and Instructions for adjusting.

Choosing Reloadable Cassettes

The vast majority of cassettes for 35mm cameras can be divided into two types, the sort with a fixed velvet-lip light trap and the labyrinthine type.

Paper Grades

At their most basic, paper grades could hardly be easier to understand or to master. Paper grades range from 00 (very soft) to 5 (very hard).

Handling 120 Film

It is amusing that today, 120 film is regarded as a professional medium that is difficult to handle. After all, for decades it was the amateur standard for snapshots, used without a second thought by even the most fumble-fingered.

The Medium Formats

For most practical purposes, ‘medium format’ can be taken as synonymous with 120/220 roll film, though another way to define it is by what it is not: it is bigger than 35mm, and is therefore not ‘miniature’ but it is smaller than 9x12cm or 4×5 inch, and therefore not ‘large format’.